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to be fiscally responsible and reduce the deficit. to make velft to grow our economy and to meet our obligation to our seniors, to our families and to our future and the republican budget fails all three. republican budget threatens our nation by undermining our economic growth and by shifting the financial burden for the deficit, and the deficit reduction, to our seniors and the middle class. republicans have made their choices clear, end medicare as we know it, adding costs to seniors today and ending the medicare guarantee tomorrow, slashing investments necessary for economic competitiveness and giving millionaires an average of $400,000 in tax breaks. republican budget eliminates protection for millions of our sickest seniors who depend on nursing home and home health services and republican budget will increase taxes for average middle-class families by $3,000. their choices will cost two million jobs next year alone and decrease economic growth by 1.7%. in contrast, the democratic alternative present serves -- preserves the medicare guarantee and makes investments in education, innovation
to the economy. the economy needs financial assistance from the outside from the european union and i'm afraid the people running the show presumably the germans in the first instance have decided greek depositors should take a hit. the way that played out at least over the weekend was all depositors would take a hit of some kind no matter how small their deposit. it sales to be now an attempt to back away from that and focus on people with deposits over 100,000 euros targeting in part russians who hold a large amounts of money, claims on those cyprian banks. >> rose: when that happened what was the talk in the financial community citing your com a couple quotes one from dennis gotman the binging has been shaken to its roots. the banking depends on trust. he wrote a note to his clients trust that has now been shattered, broken and destroyed. jim o'neal at goldman sachs says astonishing with very little thought of containing. >> bailout 101 is you want to keep the money in the banks. you want to avoid a run on the banks. you want to avoid where people are standing outside wanting their cash be
to jump-start the economy, not just the stock market. let's go to nicole petallides at new york stock exchange. david: let's start, nicole. we start with fedex it was an extraordinary run-up. it was in the $100 range. it pulls back quite a bit. this is the biggest pullback since 2011? >> certainly is, the biggest pull back since 2011. concerns globally and also going to cut down what they're shipping over it asia. lauren: how is oracle looking ahead of their earnings release, nicole? >> we're watching oracle closely in the tax realm. we'll see whether or not they have earnings. [closing bell rings] david: best buy up another 5%. that stock can not be denied. as you her the bells are ringing on wall street. looks like the indexes are going to keep essentially where they were before and after ben bernanke began to talk. looked like they were sliding a bit. they stopped that slide. trading this the 50 to 60-point range on the dow. the s&p is doing better percentagewise. nasdaq is doing well. russell 2000, small and mid-sized caps doing well. there are interesting company stories and sect
laugh. we'll get his prediction where natural gas prices are headed next. >>> not even a down economy can crush rock and roll. legendar kiss rockers gene simmons and paul stanley kick off a big expan shun of their restaurants. they're here in first on fox interview to tell us why now is the time to bet on the consumer. even when they say it's not it is always about money melissa: first let's turn to today's market moment. fears over cyprus's bailout led to a choppy day of trading on wall street. the dow managed to eke out a slight gain wi the nasdaq and s&p 500 posting minor laws. the s&p fell for thehird straight seson. that is the worst losing streak of the year. microsoft could be in some hot water with the justice department. microsoft and some of its business partners are being investigated over a foreign bribery claims. government officials in china, italy and romania were allegedly bribed to earn software contracts but shares of microsoft still managed to close the day up slightly. >>> all right we start tonight in cyprus. th parliament rejected the tax on bank deposits, potent
national debt is bigger than our entire economy. unless we change course, we will add another 9 trillion over the next ten years to our national debt. that debt will weigh down our country and our economy like an anchor. at some point, lenders will lose confidence in us. they will demand higher interest rates. and when they do, interest rates across the country will skyrocket on credit cards, mortgages, car loans, families. as interest rates rise, debt payments will overwhelm all other items in the budget and the debt will overwhelm the economy. our finances will collapse, the safety net will unravel and the most vulnerable that is who suffers the most under a debt crisis. a debt crisis would be the most predictable disaster in our history i look back at 2008 like it was jerds sometimes and i remember seeing all the all that was happening and i remember the panic meetings with the treasury secretary and looking back we can see what happened but at the moment it was a crisis that hit us like surprise and look what happened at the meantime look at the trillions of dollars of wealth loss, l
security at this time is not the deficit. it is the economy. it is the lack of jobs. it is a future where the u.s. cannot compete with its global peers. this will bring us closer to that scenario. chairman ryan and i share wisconsin. this is a blue-collar county where people are proud of the work they do and they want to be working. but they are struggling. four years ago, 2000 employees lost their jobs. a company announced they were shutting down. we do not help them or america when we keep tax incentives for companies to ship jobs overseas instead of incentivizing companies to hire in wisconsin and in america. we do not help them when we cut programs and raise taxes on the middle class so we can lower the tax rates for the top earners in this country. that seems to be what we received in the budget that is on our guest today. budget should reflect values. what we need to do is focus on economic growth and how to get the people of america back to work. we need a real path to prosperity. when we invest in infrastructure, research, development, small business loans, we can increase competi
it is important to realize that it is possible to make investments in our economy today, create jobs, repeal the sequester, and still reduce our deficit in a responsible and laled way. -- and balanced way. in closing i urge my colleagues not to be scared by the rhetoric that sometimes we hear. instead, i urge my colleagues to support one of the multiple budget proposals that reduce our deficit responsibly while creating jobs today and protecting the important programs like medicaid and medicare for generations to come. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back her time. the gentleman from georgia. mr. woodall: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i thank the gentlelady for being with me on the floor today. i'll say that we sometimes have some controversy in the rules committee, mr. speaker. there is a lot of responsibility that lies in the rules committee. with 435 folks here in this chamber. we all would like to have our say. we'd all like to have our say probably more than once. and the rules committee's tasked wi
our ailing economy and certainly not the answer for the hardworking folks back home in wyoming. when you start with one party doing the drafting and those who wrote the budget hold the majority on the budget committee, you can expect the bill to be one-sided. if you keep on doing whatever you a been doing, you can expect to get the same results. unfortunately, i believe that's what we'll see this week as we debate the budget here on the senate floor. the majority kept us in the dark on the budget until the last -- until last wednesday evening. we had to present our opening statements in the budget committee before we even sue the budget the majority -- even saw the majority the budget would offer. i do have to say in the defense of the majority that that's the way it's been for several years, both when the republicans were in charge and when the democrats are in charge. thea's thacharge that doesn't mean it is right. you have to share it. so then we had to turn around and start voting on the amendments the next morning in the budget committee and we weren't part of that process, beca
reserve's two day meeting on the economy wraps up. that begins at 2:30 eastern time. >> coming up, the head of immigration and customs enforcement testifies about the release of nearly 2000 immigrants because of budget constraints. the 2014 budget plan put out by chairman paul ryan would balance the budget in 10 years and put in place medicare changes. the chamber should finish work on boating on the measure on wednesday. here is tuesday's debate. mr. ryan: i bring forward and present the budget resolution for the fiscal year 2014. we believe that we owe the american people a responsible balanced budget and that is precisely what we are bringing to the floor today. our budget balances the budget within 10 years and it does so without raising taxes. balancing the budget will help us foster a healthier economy, it will help us create jobs. in fact, two leading economists released a study analyzing our budget and its positive effects on the economy and jobs. in the first year they said it would, quote, boost the economy immediately, increasing both of our economy by a whole percentag
company with extraordinarily small economy. the fact it would precipitate a run with the greek banks or italian banks and bring down the entire system in europe, fumbling along, kicking the can down the road is really pretty fried and we know from experience these events, whether in the balkins with the shooting of an arch duke or whether in cyprus with the shooting of a banking system can lead to fairly significant consequences for the entire european continent and us. >> so far, the worst-case scenario hasn't happened yet. so far. that's good. let me ask you, steve forbes. do you believe that the united states can make itself immune? are we strong enough economically, and financially, to withstand the kind of worst-case scenario that senator gregg discussed? >> the answer is no. we should have learned that from 2008 when these dominos start to topple. it hits everybody. and this is what is so inexplicable. why did the germans draw the line on this, for sheer domestic political reasons. they don't want to be bailing out russian oil gargs. they have an election this year. they have k
jobs and improve the economy in every one of our districts, in every state in the union. i would turn, if i could, to my colleague, mr. polcan, who has some of the rations. >> i am glad you brought this amendment forward, mr. blumenauer. when i was on the joint committee on finance, we were the only committee in the country that had to approve every single dollar that came through from the recovery dollars. in our state, every single dollar came to our committee. i got to see exactly where those investment dollars went to our transportation projects. we had a report at the time from the road building and vertical construction industry, not your most left-wing organization, that said 54,000 jobs were saved or created in wisconsin because of that investment in infrastructure. i remember sitting in this very room and i asked dr. elmendorf that same question. i said is it true, and he set up to 3.3 million jobs were saved or created because of those recovery dollars. i can tell you in wisconsin, we saw the benefit. it came from the private sector. we saw the benefit for small businesses -
to give the state all of our resources which would be at least 3 billion euros to help the economy. maybe a little bit of help from heaven. back over to you. >> the archbishop, this is something people should go look up this piece of the story. this is a fascinating piece. he's seen as this spiritual leader there who has been quite vocal. he's been out there talking saying let's get out of the euro and go back to the pound. do we have carolyn? can i briefly ask what it's like on the ground there? we understand that it may be several more days, not just thursday, before people can access their money in cyprus. >> absolutely. initially we know that banks were going to be closed up until tomorrow but at this point there's a lot of speculation that banks will be closed up until tuesday because monday is another bank holiday and at this point it's very, very uncertain that we'll get a viable plan b to get the bailout deal in place at this point it doesn't look like we'll get it by tomorrow. at this point we are expecting that banks are going to be closed for a little bit longer. of course that
chosen a woman to be head of the national bank. she served as economy minister from 2008 to 2009 and the first female central banker for a g-8 country. she'll take over from an inflation fighter. it should happen in june. the appointment raised questions about the central bank's independence and concerns kremlin will push for looser policy. we want to know what you think of the measure. is it a significant one for females, for the g-8 or for russia's monetary policy. send us your thoughts here. if you are just joining us, these are your headlines. italy prepares to test bond markets with its first long-term auction since a rating downgrade from fitch. spanish retail giant sees shares dip despite reporting solid profits and senate democrats tee up to reveal their own budget plan. straight ahead on the program, can the dow close at a high for a record ninth day? we'll preview the u.s. trading session when we come back. stay here. today is gonna be an important day for us. you ready? we wanna be our brother's keeper. what's number two we wanna do? bring it up to 90 decatherms. how b
's face it. cyprus is a small economy. the smallest thread can unravel the entire tapestry of the euro zone. the size of cyprus is not the point here. the point is the principle, precedent and risk of contagion spiralling out of control. >> that's how we see it here. thank you, charles dallara. now it's time to ask the money question. will cyprus and the eu woes kill our economic optimism? we'll debate that next up. the real loser could be crooked russian billionaires whose money-laundering operations in cyprus run the country. that's why vladimir putin is so angry about this bank tax. feel like capitalism may be the best bet to prosperity, but there is not one ounce of free market capitalism in this cyprus story. i'm larry kudlow. we'll be right back. [ female announcer ] what if the next big thing, isn't a thing at all? it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it ge
times the size of its economy without having some kind of bail structure in a solution, it becomes very difficult. and i think that understanding is quite clear among investors. so from a longer term perspective, i think there's a positive element here which is a more substantial bailin in this solution. >> valentin, what kind of exposure do you have in europe at this point and what changes have you made in regard to how the cypriot levy is handled? >> it is creating a bit of uncertainty. clearly, it comes from lingering uncertainty over the political situation in italy. so all in all, it makes the bit more cautious on europe. not so much on our overall willingness to take risks. we're still overweight global real estate, but we have still put down our exposure in europe, so we are now under weight european equities. we are cautious on peripheral bull markets and european fixed income space. so that is the main changes. still on the regional allocation that we have, but not so much altering our overall willingness to look for risk. i think in general, the broadening of the global cycle
's an means to the end. we want to revival upper mobility and growth in this economy. >> senate democrats are going to release their own spending plan after calling the republican proposal unacceptable. it will call for about $1 trillion in new revenues by closing tax loopholes and about 1 trillion in spending cuts at the same time but no structural changes to medicare and the question is will that get -- do either of these plans get anybody anywhere or is everyone talking to themselves? >> they're talking to themselves. we discussed it yesterday. in the last negotiations you still have the fact there are republicans who think that the republicans gave too much and then there are democrats who think that the democrats didn't get enough. so you have those clashing interests. >> i think what happened in january kind of derailed everything because by having these incremental advances instead of a grand bargain throws off the possibility that you do get the grand bargain. you see both sides digging in making sure they respond to their base saying the types of things that their base wants to h
insolvent. the banks in cyprus are huge, eight times the size of the economy. consider that here in the united states. our banking system is roughly one-time the size of our economy. what we're waiting to see next are they going to get this through parliament and get it done? it is so controversial they're trying to find out different ways to make it less controversial. impose the tax on larger shareholders to a much greater degree. it was originally 9.9% and you go to 12%. if you didn't want to tax the small guys at all you'd have to go to 15% or 16%. this is the scene when the president walked into the palace headquarters. there were people there with no written on their hand and this says merkel stole our money. keep in mind, european union will still give them 10 billion euros and they were trying to come up to reduce the original size from 17 billion euros. the other thing to keep in mind, by taxing depositors they're taxing a lot of foreigners and a lot of russians who had kept their money. the thing is will the rest of europe, will small depositors across the rest of europ
home building numbers today too. >> that too. we're in a niche market. the u.s. has had their economy outperform other economies and i think it's a flight to safety relative to the u.s. markets on one hand and it's an unwind from the bond market and risk exposure going forward to rate changes on the other hand. so it's both a flight to safety as well as, you know, what's really going on domestically and people are looking at a twist now with the fed and what their posture will be heading forward. >> i'll be back, adobe earnings at the top of the hour. >> take care, maria. >> what do you think? we're finishing positive here. this market doesn't want to go up? you think some of that's short covering? >> i think that's what we're see right now. finishing up the day. right now people will have to play it cautiously. we haven't seen the end of the cyprus thing. we have some negotiating going on from russia. the impact of that, as you mentioned, is a little minor relative to the size and scope of them, but it's whether or not that moves into italy, spain, as we've all been talking about. >>
reserves lately. they did lower their inflation rate, express concern about the economy. i was surprised that the market is buying euro/swiss on this. we feel that euro/swiss is going to head out, that they are very concerned. the actual statement didn't break any new grounds, but i guess the vigor with which they reiterated their desire to defend the floor influenced some people in the market. >> don't they just love a central bank to come -- i know the message has been here. in some points, the swiss bank is benefiting more from the fact that people seem more willing to take a risk with the euro as opposed to chooting to fight it on the floor at this point. >> i think so. it's interesting with respect to the italian election that even though this considerable uncertainty doesn't seem to be showing up in terms of the sorts of tail risk factors that were taking the euro down last year. so i think that the snb is benefiting from that. they do have a lot of credibility and they indicate that they will use opportunities to push euro/swiss up. and i think that the market is mindful of that,
to the forefront and that's more important. the u.s. economy, china and although there is a big idea they're stealing customer's money and savings accounts is abomination, i believe it's a different european country. entered the european union in 2008, i don't think it will be as big of a deal as people think, i think it will be on the headlines for two weeks. stuart: all right, let's see what's happening on the opening bell, upside. and i'm looking for a gain of 20, 30 points for the time they're open, 10 points higher, 14,462. nicole, let's bring you in. one of your favorite stocks, we're watching it closely. yoga pants, they say they're too sheer. in other words, you can see through them. i think that the stock is way down. nicole: it is way down. it's going to hurt their bottom line. and they're talking about bringing in the pants that are sheer. that basically is like a fall for the company, you can't have pants that are sheer. i have to admit my lululemon, i noticed recently is sheer and it's no joke and you're able to bring them back in, but it's going to hurt their revenue and bot
of the economy that are not that strong and i don't know what the sequester will bring in the month of april. >> look, the data say things are better, and i think the fed will be under a lot of pressure because interest rates are headed higher. >> at some point the fed will have to acknowledge that -- and they have -- to your point, they changed the language a little bit. it's a moderate recovery and it's a strengthening recovery. words like that. >> right. >> at some point they're going to have to acknowledge what we all seem to know which is -- they're not great, but things are getting better. now will inflation pick up and that, of course, is the fed's number one mandate. will inflation pick up until we see jobs pick up because wage inflation comes with excess demand from workers. i don't know. that's the big trillion dollar question mark. >> commodity inflation whether it be corn or copper and the strong dollar will contain inflation that's going up a great deal. housing is stabilizing and not really in the numbers. i want to take issue with some of what you said. i think we all think th
of the economy is about 18 billion euros, so the banking industry is four times the size of the economy. if you allow the banks to fail, much like letting citibank or jpmorgan here in the united states, that would have significant repercussion the in the economy. connell: where do you stand on the idea of the con cement spreading? could it happen in other countries was the question asked, it seemed like, in the markets this morning if it goes through on cypress, on to the next guy and next who have problems? >> that's a legitimate concern that the architect or one of the principle architects here, the imf, the ecb, and the european union and germany with a strong hand there. if they force this upon one country, who is to say they couldn't force it upon a larger, more important country? if europe were able to execute a plan like that, who is to say that the united states wouldn't look and say, well, they did it in europe, why couldn't we look here? connell: rule of law question; right? >> exactly. dagen: what's the solution? somewhere between forcing the haircut and letting banks fail? where is
of energy conclude we can safely export natural gas, this is not even about a trade off between the economy and the environment. we can do these projects, prevents these projects will stop a lot of jobs from being created, it is not going to make a development in global emissions. it making no sense to me and the economy. neil: malia. >> i just quickly top say, i understand how we like to take things and combine themm but, i do not think that the only reason why keystone project is not happening is because, barack obama asked his agency this question, to get back to original topic, what i think is really important for us to look forward and you know neil, i don't think that anyone would disagree with you that jobs are important, the problem with laser beam focus you have a society and a lot of things that need to be focused on, laser beaming becomes narrowing, i don't think that is how we' our president or anyone in congress to just have like this one bullet silver bullet solution on what will save the u.s., that is not only thing that u.s. nee right now, we not only have a jobs problem. ne
. that's good for 125th in the world. per sapt a gdp, $26,900. 71% of the economy service based. tourism big there. 20% is industry. 8.5% agriculture, mostly olives and citrus. in a nut shell, finance ministers are going to hold a conference call this evening to discuss a proposed bailout for the cypriot banks. the plan started this weekend included taking money from regular bank deposit, large and small, 6.75% to almost 10% if you've got more than 100,000 euros in an account over there. why are those banks in cyprus in trouble? they were heavily exposed to greek debt and we all know what happened there with the greek debt, both public and private. then the cypriot banks were national as ied to prevent an need colorado lapse. european regs, that's where the rest of europe comes in. instead of sending a bailout like it did in spain and greece, germany wants to raise money from actual people with deposits in those banks. here's how goldman sachs' paul o'neill summed it up on "squawk" this morning. >> i got off a plane from singapore saturday morning and i thought my jet lag was up but i wa
. he has an economic ph.d. as he inherits a slower growing economy, he'll face pressure to tackle china's widening wealth gap. eunice yoon joins us now with more. there were 2940 yes votes, six who abstained and three who voted no. >> yeah. an overwhelming majority of the people decided to vote him in. but at the same time, most people had expected that he would have the support of the vast majority of the people. he is really seen as a capable steward of the economy, which is really important because the premier shift is the most important job of the premier is really to manage the economy. he's been credited with helping to really navigate china through a very difficult time through the financial crisis. and also to push through much needed reforms. a lot of people think that he is going to go down with his well with his counterparts overseas. he speaks good english. he's been described as being very informed. but he does have his critics. there are people here who have said that he's too passive, he's indecisive and he hasn't been total lly forgiven for a role h played regarding heal
production and find out how much capacity to utilize in march. speaking of the markets and the economy, our own steve liesman caught up with new treasury secretary jack lew yet. among the topics discussed, whether there is a reason to worry about a bubble right now. >> the analysis i've seen doesn't give me reason to be worried right now. i think one of the lessons we learned from 2008, 2009 is that even when things are not a problem, we always have to ask those questions. we need to make sure that our -- we have the transparency to see what's going on in firms, in markets. we need to have the regulatory tools to deal with problems as they develop. >> and we're going to talk more about the markets and questions about a potential bubble later on this morning. we've got a great guest lineup today, guys. named money manager bill miller of legg mason and former fed chairman alan greenspan. we're going to find out if he sees any similarities between today's environment and the situation back in 1996. the last time we had this kind of run when he gave his now famous irrational exuberance speech.
in a trillion dollars. you would still be left with a deficit and you would wreck the economy. martha: interesting lesson. stuart, thanks very much. we'll be watching it throughout the day as i know you will. let's look at bigger picture of europe's debt crisis. five countries needed bailouts from the european central bank and imf. greece, spain, ireland, portugal as stuart mentioned. germany the fifth biggest. great britain at number eight. france with the 9th largest. italy at number ten. they all shrunk in the last quarter of last year. europe is basically contracting. the eurozone is losing huge numbers of jobs. a record 19 million people are unemployed. it is a tough picture and one we need to watch closely here at home. bill: sure do. no telling when that thing will get straightened out. >>> more rough water for carnival cruise lines. another disabled ship of vacationers, limping back to port. legend arriving yesterday. a leading senator calling for a passenger bill of rights. what would be in that bill? peter doocy live in washington. what would this bill of rights do, peter? >
can be the linchpin in our economy over here. it's ridiculous. >> right. it should be a smaller problem. they could take care of this in other ways. they could print money or -- >> i'm not going to pick a state here. it would probably be a southern state, but a poor southern state cannot take the down the united states. >> a western state because they're not awake yet. but here we are. out of the 22 -- cyprus? >> you thought greece was small, cyprus is -- >> come on, cypriots? i remember some conflicts. i thought it was a golf course, which would be a much bigger problem to me. >> let's introduce our guest host this morning, kenny dichter, co-founder of avian. why do i always mispronounce it? because you've been b drinking it. >> avione is airplane in french and spanish. >> can we get a full shot of this? he's now the chairman of juicepress. i have been drinking this stuff for the past week, virtually, five days. >> and you know what? your skin tone has never looked better. >> no food up until this saturday. you've been doing this now -- >> 22 days. >> i've made my cleanse zero
crude prices can tell us about the broader economy. stick around. ♪ ♪ no two people have the same financial goals. pnc works with you to understand yours and help plan for your retirement. visit a branch or call now for your personal retirement review. at a hertz expressrent kiosk, you can rent a car without a reservation... and without a line. now that's a fast car. it's just another way you'll be traveling at the speed of hertz. all stations come over to mithis is for real this time. step seven point two one two. verify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. >>> good morning. welcome back to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm joe kernen along with becky quick and andrew ross sorkin. u.s. equity futures at this hour after giving back about 62, well off the lows yesterday. indicated that a bounce a little, but a time can happen between thou and 9:30 on the east coast. there's energy, you see crude
is the security industry as a more efficient supplier of funds to the real economy than banks. it's simply less costly to sell bonds, notes and commercial paper to investors and to borrow from a bank. the mid-1980s intermediating transactions, the security industry has supplied 15 times more financing to the real economy and banking and has done so without government regulation. when the financial crisis came, lipid regulated investment aches like bear stearns, lehman brothers and merrill lynch did no worse than heavily regulated fdic insured commercial banks like waconia, washington mutual and indie mac. it's hard to see more and tighter regulation is the end there. what we are watching the name of prudential regulation is the government squeezing the life out of the banking industry through the interstate commerce commission gradually squeezed the life out of the railroads. if we let the government insurance provide regulation to the security business for some regulators have now proposed will pay a heavy price in lost economic growth. finally, it even natural supporters of free-market and me
capital economy will flea to lower tax states. >> we have the right to change the rules op you after the fact, and that's what's nos fair. >> some in sacramento are trying to unwind this. california's not cypress, it's not taking, but to many, it is clearly unfair. >> no, it is. it is so unfair. i mean, changing the rules after the fact is crazy. william thank you for the report. >> you bet. >> well, in the mean time, a huge win if you're one who likes to resell things from ebay to yard sales, and itch ed -- rich edson in washington. rich? >> e bay and overstock.com love the decision. publishers, not so much. the supreme court questioned whether a student could buy cheaper, foreign made and sold textbooks and resell them in the united states for profit. copyrights permits sales only overseas, but the courts said no. once americans buy an item, they buy and resell it of the the other decision could have made it difficult to resell foreign items in the u.s.. libraries say the decision is a landmark win for consumers, small businesses, online marketplaces, retailers, and libraries natio
'll have a long-lasting impact on our economy. we've been dealing with a lousy europe for a long time. but you'll have this pullback at 5 percent which is about 1484 and 7% at 53, i might consider getting back in, but i'm not doing it until then. cheryl: looks like europe doesn't have a plan, obvious. let's go to the nymex, jeffrey grossman. jeff, let's talk about the oil contract. one of things we saw today again was the safety of the u.s. dollar. you had traders around the world jumping into the dollar. your take. >> today was really a dream come true in many respects. we walked in this morning, the dollar was very strong, took our market down right to the support level. 91.75 and spot crude was a major support level on the way down. the minute the dollar weakened, came off those highs a little bit, market rallied right pack to where the resistance levels are which is in the high 93.85 to $94 level. it's behaving like a normal market really with a little input that came in from the european information here, but the truth of the matter is this is a market that still, again, is a sal
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tightening the money market and the liquidities condition in the economy and where we flexed in the capital markets these days. >> great point. raymond yung joining us. thanks very much. a reminder again that what we're seeing in markets today isn't just about cyprus. it could potentially be that seasonal time of year once again where global sitters come to the fore. >>> straight ahead, find out why our next guest says the bank robbery is nothing more than legalized robbery. ery. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. there. i said it. they don't have pictures of my kids. they don't have my yoga mat. and still, i feel at home. could it be the flat screen tv? the not so mini fridge? ♪ the different free dinner almost every weeknight? or maybe, it's all of the above. and all the rest. am i home? nope. but it almost feels that way. homewood suites by hilton. be at home. >>> welcome back to "worldwide exchange." stocks falling around the globe with european banks deeply in the red as the cyprus bailout and co
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to traderse it'0 different companies. it gives us a better sense of what is happening with the economy. this index has yet to reach a record high. that is one of the reasons that people of skeptical about this rally. when we start to see this specific index reaching to new territory, that is when we think we'll get a little more conviction about where we're going next. >> this mostly touches people fortunate to have retirement funds, but this next point touches everybody. word pretty much on everything we buy is on the rise? >> biggest increase we have seen in consumer prices in three to four years. so many americans are dealing with smaller paychecks because of the payroll tax cut and with what you have left you are shelling out more money to buy the things you need every day. specifically gasoline prices on the rise, consumer places up .07% in the month of february driven by a 9% rise in gasoline prices. this pretty much explains a big reason why everyday americans aren't participating in this market rally when you are not able to have extra money in your pocket because you are spend
and other nations, think it is too soon to suggest that. it is the banking system the size of this economy, you talk about the fact that large percentage of the deposit are outside attempting to trick the nation and the bank in the unique way. i sure hope they backpedal on insurance deposits, that would provide a little bit of stability and i hope they suggest this is not something we're looking to do broadly across the euro zone nations. melissa: do you think they will do that, or do you think the opposite, that other people follow suit? this is really unprecedented. they're basically skimming people's bank accounts. >> i agree with both of you, which is always a good thing to do. the fact is they will try to reassure people this is a one off thing. they have rung the spell. now people know especially larger depositors know if they're in italy or spain they could be hit by this. the one thing we have not mentioned is russia. love those large deposits are from russians. including those who had taken the money. the fact they're taking a haircut is not anything people want to cry tears over,
the letter, fearing high-tech investors who helped build the venture capital economy will flee to lower tax states. >> the game is rigged. you can't possibly win because we have the right to change the rules after the fact. that is what is not fair. >> governor jerry brown is reviewing the situation. now these taxpayers can request a waiver if you will, david, hoping that the governor, lawmakers hammer out a deal. if no not, no reprieve, taxman comes, 120 million going to the state from about 3,000 people who thought they were helping small business. david? david: it can happen here. it is happening here in california! william la jeunesse. thanks, man. >>> disney world turning some kids away at the park gates. that story when we go "off the desk" in a just a couple minutes. ♪ your finances can't manage themselves, but that doesn't mean they won't try. bring all your finances togeth with the help of the one person who can, a certified financial planner professional. cfp -- let's make a plan. ♪ [ male announcer ] help brazil reduce its overall reliance on foreign imports th the launch of
. how much of a threat is the happening in europe to the u.s. economy right now? >> also, two huge interviews still to come. meredith whitney tells us why she's very bullish on one of wall street's biggest banks and right now. and cit group chairman and ceo john thain reacts to the rumor that will not go away. namely that his company has been shopping for a suitor. john will try and lay those fears aside once again, those rumors. >> a look at where we stand as we approach this final stretch, final hour of the day. dow jones industrial down about 26 points. had been down 110. we are well off of the lows. nasdaq looks like this. also pretty volatile in the afternoon here. as you can see, it is down about five points at 3243. s&p 500 really similar move here. down five points. equities showing great resilience, pushing back from a triple digit loss today. will the crisis abroad keep the markets in jeopardy? >> you had to be named steve to be on the panel today for the most part. steven water from russell investments, steve sacks. steve liesman is with us. and then there's that guy san
over the past three years over an economy that's produced over 6.3 million private sector jobs and we have more work to do. and this president's number one priority is growth and job creation. >> what a bunch of-- there's 20 million more americans on food stamps, number one. and number two, we have one in six americans in poverty. what would dr. carson do if he was president. would you cut back? >> well, i would certainly cut back, but the pay i would cut is evenly, but i would give the managers of each department discretion because they know where the fat is. they're not going to cut the muscle, they're going to cut the fat. it seems like what the president is doing is trying to cut in the places where it hurts the most in order to prove a point and i -- if ever the mainstream media reaches a point where they recognize that if we destroy this nation and destroy the economy, they, too, will be destroyed, i think at that point they will start asking the tough questions and helping to move the population in the right direction. >> sean: don't hold your breath, dr. carson. i declared in
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are giants in the european economy can affect the risk appetite globally and that is very tenuous at high levels. >> steve sedgwick, nice to see you, thank you. >>> less than a week into his tenure at the vatican, pope francis has defined himself as a pontiff to the people and something of a challenge to his security detail. the new pope broke protocol and made an impromptus appearance at the side gate of the vatican where he shook hands and kissed babies. pope francis then gave his first prayer to the virgin mary which focused on mercy and forgiveness and drew cheers by closing his remarks with the italian phrase for "have a good lunch." let us know why you're awake. shoot us an a e-mail or tweet me @thomasaroberts. we'll read the best responses later in the show. >> still ahead, brackets are set, march madness here. i want to break down the teams to watch and surprising names that didn't make the big dance. >>> controversy surrounding the series "the bible." the actor chosen to play the character satan is raising eyebrows. that and a check of weather when we come back. >> the comments w
like chuck todd doesn't understand the economy. he's a political reporter. it's time we separate political reporters from real journalists because they don't understand whaeut what is going on with the ryan budget. we can't have a serious discussion about entitlements if we are truly going to have political reporters hogging up the front pages of what is going on. it's time that editors put the economists, and those reporters, journalists who understand the economy on the front page. jon: paul krugman is an economist an didn't like it. >> he is shoved to the opinion side of reporting. jon: the senate hasn't passed a budget in nearly four years. what happens in washington? you worked on capitol hill, when you don't have a budget what happens? >> they do continuing resolutions and they just keep doing continuing resolutions. the problem is -- you can keep funding the government, that is not the issue. the issue is there is no long-term plan. jon: and there is no benchmark. >> yeah, there is no vision. you have -- you need the president coming out and laying out, here is my long-ter
♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. bill: so onward we go, huh? two more weeks of lent. martha: two more weeks of lent as we were discussing. have a great day everybody. "happening now" starts right now. jenna: right now we have brand new stories and breaking news. >> the fbi on the scene of the university of central florida after a suspicious death there. plus explosives were found inside a dorm. we're live with breaking details. >>> the gop's bold new plan for the future. what the party needs to connect with voters it finds. >>> china out with a new warning for the united states about plans to beef up our missile defense system. how this could impact growing tensions with north korea. it's all "happening now.". >>> fox news alert on a campus in chaos. police are investigating a apparent suicide find weapons and explosive devices at the university of central florida. that is how we begin this monday. i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. ucf is canceling classes just hours after evacuating a dor
the size of the economy of cyprus. >> bret: russians have $30 billion. >> right. a quarter of it are russians. they say we will tax people who live here but have money deposited here, stashed here to protect it from russia and they see it as an easy out. easy way to get money to satisfy the imf. in response to the imf making an effort to bail them out. that is why he said this is the best solution for us. we saw individuals on tape saying gosh, you know, violation of my property rights, et cetera. those are small time players in the large game. >> bret: but still getting money out of their account. >> they are. >> there is discussion of shifting that to the wealthier. depositors, in cyprus. this is all about russia. german secret service did a study not long ago that looked at the kind of deposits that were made in the cypriate banks from the russians in particular and concluded a lot of it was dirty money. germans don't want their taxpayers to be funding risky bets from russian alagarks. with an election in germany they don't want to answer to the taxpayers for this. steve
of 2023, the economy will be at a crawl. we will have $8 trillion added to the debt. >> in a trip to a national laboratory outside of chicago, the president made a number of very light-hearted comments about the impact of the sequester. the speech went on to focus on the energy proposal. >> those who have chairs, lease feel free to sit down, everyone was standing and i thought...the laboratory, you know, an effect of the sequester, you had to...get rid of chairs. glad we got you chairs. >> as you mention two different tones, the speech coming on the heels of a rare three day visit to capitol hill where he reaped across party lines to encourage compromise. >> back to you. >> now, because another bombshell in the benghazi story this morning. perhaps the white house hoped the story had gone away but it turns out that we were wondering, why haven't we heard from any of the survives? why not hear from the press? we only hear from hillary clinton and high level officials, why have we not heard from the survivors who were there at the consulate when this unfolded? this only we could have
and spain and most global banks have a lot of exposure to those two countries and their economies are much bigger and more important. david: what about hsbc or barclays? both have a lot of branches in cyprus. >> well, barclays has a lot of exposure to spain which is something i would be worried about. david: okay. >> and hsbc has a global bank has exposure to just about everything. only sew societe generale has exposure to cyprus and national bank of greece. it is basically government-owned anyway now. david: what i don't understand, maybe you can explain it to me, erin, why is it, these are international banks. i can understand cypriot banks. that is different situation. some of those might be bought out by the russians anyway. if i have an international bank and an international account in an international bank in cyprus or spain, in international currencies, euros, why can't i move my operation to another country that is not at risk? >> will, i think is exactly what they're worried about. that is why there's a bank holiday cyprus. the banks are expected to reopen on thursday and they're
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